Winter White Plaid Pillow

Thistle Key Lane has a new look! I’m very excited about the new layout with the easy to read menu and wide photos. Thank you for stopping by to see my latest project.

Trending now: Large wide zippers.

Catching my attention in the fashion world these days, are wide zippers on skirts, sweaters and even lacy dresses.  Zippers are becoming part of the design in so many creative ways. In some instances, turning what was once considered a formal look into something playful and sporty.   Why not approach home decor with the same attitude.

Large wide zipper for fashion and function

Large wide zipper for fashion and function

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What’s Old is New Again

We love to hear stories of the cute and innocent things we did as children.  I remember my mom telling me, when I was five, my Sunday school teacher Charlotte asked me where I got my beautiful dress.  I told her matter-of-factly, my mother made it from one of her old suits that was out of style.  Evidently, Charlotte was very impressed with the sophisticated rich colors of the woven tweed and beautiful buttons made into a smart-looking jumper. After church she made a point of complimenting my mother on her resourcefulness.  My mother said she was a little embarrassed over the whole thing, especially when her friend kept going on and on about it! She wasn’t upset with me of course, for telling the truth.  After all, we were at church!

My mom did have an amazing talent for stretching a small budget. My “what’s old is new again” is almost as clever and I didn’t spend a dime.

After combing through a couple of fabric stores, looking for fabric to recover the cushion on the newly painted wicker chair, I came back empty-handed.  Determined to find the right material, I started going through the linen closet and discovered a euro sham I saved from Pottery Barn.

The sham hardly looked used, so I saved it after the last master bedroom update.  Now it has a new purpose.

Fitting sham to cushion

Fitting sham to cushion

I decided to approach this project just like the slip cover I made for the love seat.

The sham was turned inside out and the cushion was inserted. After centering the cushion inside and pinning the opening closed across the center, I proceeded to pin all around the edge.

After stitching around the edge the extra fabric is trimmed away.

After stitching around the edge the extra fabric is trimmed away.

 

Then I carefully removed the cushion and sewed where the pins marked the outline of the cushion.

Next, I carefully cut away the extra fabric.

In order to make the corners look fitted I made a little triangle, pinned it in place, then ran a seam across each corner.

Sandy under the guest bed watching

Sandy under the guest bed watching me taking photos.

Cushion finished

Cushion finished

The cushion with its coordinating fabric is reversible but I favor the small stripes. Velcro (my trade secret) was used to hold the opening in place and navy buttons finished the project.

Wicker chair after paint update and a slip covered cushion.

Wicker chair after new paint and a slip covered cushion.

The slip covered cushion completes the chair. One step closer to finishing the guest room!

Check out the before picture of the wicker chair in the post Color Refined.

Cheers!

Slipcover Magic

My husband has teased that if you sit too long in our house you might get painted. Soon the same may apply to being slipcovered.

 

Carved mirror table

Carved mirror table

 

I have a closet where I stash Christmas gifts, off-season decorating accessories and beneath all the really good junk was this carved table that matches the love seat I just slipcovered.

The challenge was going to be covering the table’s carved  and curvy top.  The solution I found was a piece of foam core board to place on top of the table.   I turn the table over and traced around the edge then went back and eased the curved indentions into an oval shape. The foam core board also creates and even surface on the top since the mirror is lower than the carved edge.

 

Trace the shape of the table onto foam core board

Trace the shape of the table onto foam core board

 

Foam core board cut out

Foam core board cut out

 

Using a utility knife I cut around the outline until I had the desired shape.

 

Foam core board after edges are rounded

Foam core board after edges are rounded

 

I used the oval foam board as a pattern to cut out the fabric for the top then started pinning the top to the skirt. I had just enough of the 8 oz. drop cloth left over from the love seat to cover the table.

 

Pin top fabric to skirt

Pin top fabric to skirt

 

Small pleat made on each side

Small pleat made on each side

 

Reverse side of slip cover showing seams

Reverse side of slip cover showing seams

 

The skirt is two rectangle pieces of fabric with a seam on each side of the table.  I barely had enough fabric for the skirt but did managed to squeeze  a small pleat in the front and back.  After sewing the seams I trimmed the excess fabric with pinking shears.  All that was left was the hemming the skirt.

 

Great slip cover pair

Slip cover seating area

 

With a little slipcover magic, I turned two unused sentimental pieces of furniture into a functional seating area.  This may be my new reading spot and a place to stack my books.

Thank you so much for stopping by!

 

Linked up with: Slightly Coastal

©2015 Slipcover Magic was first published on Thistle Key Lane

To Slipcover or Not To Slipcover

Pink is not my signature color and the Victorian style does not match anything in our home, but after much debate, I was not ready to let go of my grandmother’s love seat. Having it upholstered was too pricy.  The answer, make a slip cover.  This was my first big adventure in making a slipcover and I’m crazy over how it turned out!

 

Love seat before

Love seat before

Of course I never would have jumped in with both feet without first studying the tutorial at the Miss Mustard Seed blog. If I can follow Marian’s instructions on slipcovers, you can too! She is very thorough and my “go to” for inspiration!

For the fabric I used an 8 oz. (9′ x 12′) drop cloth purchased from Lowe’s. Then I went back and bought another one haha!  One was more than enough for the love seat but I need more fabric to cover the large down filled cushion. I used the center seam as a guide to helped make sure both sides of the seat back, seat, and back were mirror images of each other. I would have utilized the amount of fabric more efficiently had I not used the center seam in this way.  As it turned out, the seam running down the middle adds character to a very simple design and I like it!

 

Pin sections together and trim away extra fabric, repeat....

Pin sections together and trim away extra fabric, repeat….

 

Making the slipcover was not difficult but it did take a great deal of patience.  After awhile I got the rhythm down…drape, pin, trim, drape, pin trim, repeat. You get the idea.

 

Covering the complete love seat just didn’t look right so I decided to expose the carved woodwork at the top.  My first thought was to make ties but I quickly changed my mind in favor of straps.  Think of it as a sun dress!

 

Frog closure detail used instead of a button or tie on the back

Frog closure detail used instead of a button or tie on the back

Instead of leaving an opening in the center back, the opening is where the left side panel and the back panel meet. It seemed like a better place due to the exposed woodwork on top.  This also gave me an opportunity to use the frog closure at the top.  A handsome detail!  (I’ll explain in a minute why I didn’t use buttons.)

 

 

The cushion was the last part of the project.  The challenge was trying to keep the ban of fabric going around the cushion the same width.  The cushion is really a long down pillow and rather floppy.  I think covering a more rigid cushion would be easier.

Confession time!  I don’t know how to install a zipper or make button holes so velcro is my crutch (so embarrassing).  I used velcro on the back side of the cushion where I made an envelope opening. 

 

Slip cover made from a drop cloth

Slip cover made from a drop cloth

Love seat after with slip cover

Love seat after with slip cover

The overall design is very simple and of course it would look better with fabric covered cording as suggested in the Miss Mustard Seed tutorial.  I’ll work on that for the next project, especially now that I know what to expect.

 Cheers!

© 2015 To Slipcover or Not To Slipcover was first published on Thistle Key Lane